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The time taken to show new renters your rig

SoCalRving1981
Day-tripper II

On average, about how much time should we allot for showing renters how to operate and drive a rig?

2 ACCEPTED SOLUTIONS

VagabondKaren
Weekend warrior II

Depending on the size of your rig and how many people there are, how experienced they are, etc, you can easily allot 45 minutes to an hour and a half. 

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I totally agree with @VagabondKaren. We always allot about two and a half hours of time, total (including set-up and time for unexpected situations), with one hour of that being walk-through, but when we have experienced renters, we can easily shave 20 minutes or so off of that. We've found that even experienced RVers still want to walk through basics because not every rig is the same, so it's never a quick in and out experience.

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6 REPLIES 6

VagabondKaren
Weekend warrior II

Depending on the size of your rig and how many people there are, how experienced they are, etc, you can easily allot 45 minutes to an hour and a half. 

I totally agree with @VagabondKaren. We always allot about two and a half hours of time, total (including set-up and time for unexpected situations), with one hour of that being walk-through, but when we have experienced renters, we can easily shave 20 minutes or so off of that. We've found that even experienced RVers still want to walk through basics because not every rig is the same, so it's never a quick in and out experience.

SoCalRving1981
Day-tripper II

Do you have a youtube channel or link/QR renters can access for trailer information?  I thought I saw a product on here for something like that.  We are creating a handbook with pictures. 

I created a binder with all of the info I knew from personal experience with our RV and the extra stuff we found out via customer usage. I also looked up how-to videos and consulted my user guide for the stuff that our own use and customers hadn't found yet. Once I put all of that together in the binder, I still left the pages un-laminated until I felt like we had a solid foundation.

If we decide to rent for another season (meaning summer, specifically), then we're going to make a how-to/user guide video to post on YouTube for renters to access, but I'll always have the binder in our RV because half of our renters are out of cell/WiFi serviceable areas, and renters often forget that they can download videos before departure, so the binder is the best for those situations. 

Stanbenson1
Day-tripper

After my first rental I created a shortened version of the vehicle manual and listed the important things, Like how to start the furnace and key things to remember like do not attempt to run the AC and Microwave at the same time, you won't hurt anything but you will have to reset the breaker.  It is only three pages long.  I wrote it in the order that they will use all of the accessories.

jim_hofer
Weekend warrior

Hosts renting just one RV may have the time resources to invest over two hours for Guest orientations.  For my business, however, I simply cannot afford that much time.  The question for me was, how do I fully equip my Guests for a safe, fun, successful trip while managing time demands.

I opted to produce how-to videos covering a majority of the topics addressed during a Guest's send-off orientation.  These are posted on YouTube and are forwarded to my Guest before their departure date.  I follow up by email, text, phone to make sure they have viewed the materials and also to ask them what questions they have after viewing the videos.  This can help motivate them to watch the videos, if they have not already done so.  

At the orientation, I have a list of the things that were discussed in the videos.  I mention those and check them off as I am talking about them.  I then get into the hands-on instruction on starting the RV up, driving, backing up, spotters, etc.  All of that can be done in 30 minutes or so if I stay focused.  

Some RV videos that can help shorten the on-site orientation time are:

  • Offshore generator startup
  • Steps on operating A/C while on gen power
  • Safety equipment
  • Seat belt location and requirement
  • Exterior storage and related equipment for set up (water hoses, 30/50amp power cords, pressure regulator)
  • How to empty the holding tanks. 
  • Where to check Propane fuel levels.  Show location of nearby locations to refill RV Propane tanks.
  • Common accidents, fueling station concrete posts, low bridges, low awnings at gas stations or hotels or otherwise
  • Operating the fridge/freezer on gas/electric/or 12 volt as applicable.

You can also do a search on YouTube for topics like "how to empty RV holding tanks.  You can copy and paste links to those videos if you do not want to take the time to produce videos yourself.  

If your objective is to offset payments on your RV and you are sending it out a handful of times each season, then the prep work on videos may not be justified.  If however, you find you are renting that camper or RV more and more and perhaps you've looked into adding additional rigs, well then, that's going to be a good time to reassess how you operate.  Wish you the best!

See you out there,  Camper Jim